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Sustainable Communities Catalyst Project

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Sustainable Communities Catalyst Project


The Sustainable Communities Catalyst  Project focuses on providing a holistic approach to creating healthy and sustainable homes for low-to-moderate income (LMI) individuals and families throughout 10 targeted communities within the Inland Valley (San Bernardino and Riverside).   The program utilizes 6 core strategies for stabilizing communities: Neighborhood Revitalization, Owner-Occupied Rehabilitation, Homeownership Creation and Preservation, Homeownership Finance, and Financial Education training.  The overall objective of the program is to prevent blight, promote sustainable homeownership, and serve as a catalyst to attract new private sector investors within the ten cluster communities.  As a result of these strategies, the following outcome goals are anticipated to assist LMI individuals: acquire, rehabilitate and resell distressed properties; preserve homeownership by preventing foreclosures; create homeownership opportunities for first-time homebuyers; provide down-payment assistance loans; fund grants / loans to repair homes owned by seniors or disabled veterans; provide reverse mortgage counseling to seniors; provide financial education and counseling to unbanked and underbanked LMI individuals.

Neighborhood Revitalization

Comprehensive Acquisition, Rehabilitation, and Resell

Through the Sustainable Communities Catalyst Project, NPHS targets 10 distressed neighborhoods across 2 counties (Riverside and San Bernardino) to provide comprehensive revitalization to blighted REO properties.

In San Bernardino County, the targeted neighborhoods are:

In Riverside County, the targeted neighborhoods are:

All of these regions were hit hard by foreclosures during the housing crisis.  As it became clear that these areas were suffering from the greatest number of foreclosures, low home values, and the highest unemployment, NPHS’ staff and Board of Directors decided to strategically focus resources on targeted distressed communities within these cities. NPHS purchases dilapidated REO properties from the National Community Stabilization Trust (NCST) and rehabilitates them to a safe, sustainable standard complete with green building upgrades. NPHS then sources a low-to-moderate income family to purchase the rehabilitated properties and become successful first-time homebuyers through NPHS’ homebuyer program.  To further afford the cost of homeownership, NPHS also offers down payment assistance loans to the new homebuyers.

Green Building Initiative

NPHS installs green building upgrades into each acquired REO property. These upgrades can include tankless water heaters, drought tolerant landscaping, dual pane windows, energy efficient appliances, low-flush toilets, and solar panels. These upgrades provide sustainable solutions for the environment while saving first time low-to-moderate income homebuyers crucial dollars on their monthly utility bills. NPHS is a designated Green Organization by NeighborWorks America and is proud to incorporate green upgrades into every home acquired.

Owner-Occupied Rehabilitation Grants

As part of the Sustainable Communities Catalyst Project, NPHS provides the Healthy Homes Grant – a one-time grant offered to low-to-moderate income senior and disabled residents for the health and safety retrofitting of their homes. As numerous seniors age in place, often on low fixed incomes, many find difficulty in upgrading their homes to safe, sustainable living conditions. Seniors and mobility disabled residents of the Inland Valley may receive a one-time grant for owner-occupied repairs that include wheelchair ramps, repaired roofs, grab bar installation, new flooring, or other practical solutions that create a safe and healthy living environment. Because of the success and lasting impact of the Healthy Homes grant, the City of Chino partnered with NPHS to administer their owner-occupied senior repair programs and provide lasting solutions to aging housing stock in their communities.